Memorial Day Murph Challenge

Today I completed the Murph Challenge in honor of my cousin Patrick. He wanted to join the Marines but died in a tragic act of gun violence before he could enlist. This workout was for you, Patrick, as well as all of the amazing men and women who have so bravely given their lives for our country. Thank you.

Here is a picture of my hand with my time on it.

Valve Disease Day

Heart valve disease is a generic term for any instance or event of heart valve malfunction. It includes both congenital and acquired abnormalities and applies to all four of the heart’s valves (aortic, mitral, pulmonary, and tricuspid). The three types of valvular ailments are enumerated below:

  1. Prolapse: When a structure prolapses, it falls down or forward. In the case of a heart valve, this means that the leaflets thereof do not close properly during myocardial contraction, flopping or bulging outwards instead. Often times, this leads to a condition known as regurgitation where blood leaks backwards into the chamber from which it came. In most cases, prolapse is relatively benign, resulting in a mere murmur or mild palpitations and warranting little to no treatment. It is commonly a phenomenon of the mitral valve, but technically, all valves are susceptible.
  2. Stenosis: A stenotic valve is narrowed and hardened. This makes it harder for blood to travel through the valve; consequently, corresponding chambers have to exert more force to achieve their purpose, which, in time, will lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and/or heart failure. Regurgitation can also occur. Generally, stenosis affects the aortic and pulmonary valves (particularly in congenital cases), but it can occur in the other valves as well. Stenosis is a much more serious condition than valvular prolapse, and it is consequently treated much more aggressively. Surgical intervention (keyhole or open heart) is often needed, and although valvuloplasties provide a temporary relief, the aim is either replacement or repair; valvular stenosis can also be the underlying cause of problems that warrant other surgeries including but not limited pacemaker implantation and complete heart transplants.
  3. Atresia: Similar to stenosis, atresia is an abnormal closure of a bodily passage; the term is typically used to refer to mal- or non-formed heart valves where (nearly) solid sheets of tissue disrupt blood flow. It is typically a congenital condition, and it is most frequently seen in the pulmonary valve. Cases of atresia require immediate surgical attention; catheterization treatments include radiofrequency ablation, balloon valvotomy and/or sepsotomy, and stent placement while the open-heart options feature procedures such as shunting, the Glenn repair, and the Fontan procedure; in some cases, a complete heart transplant may be necessary.

All of the above share relatively similar symptoms, including fatigue, dizziness, weakness, palpitations (and other non-perceived arrhythmias), heart murmurs, angina, edema (especially in cases of stenosis), and cyanosis (especially in instances of pulmonary atresia). They also have common risk factors including age, hypertension, diabetes, drug use, and an unhealthy body mass; connective tissue disorders (such as Marfan Syndrome), pre-existing heart disease (e.g. a history of myocardial infarction and/or atherosclerosis), and prolonged infection also predispose patients to valvular illness; congenital defects, although themselves idiopathic, are also causes. If you experience any of the aforelisted symptoms or display any of the above risk factors, consult a doctor immediately. These ailments are diagnosable through uninvasive, relatively inexpensive tests (a physical exam, an EKG, and an echocardiogram). Getting heart-checked does not take long, and it might just save your life–this Valve Disease Day and every day!

Making Pancakes on a Sunday Morning

You’ll wake up one morning, and you’ll be really, bizarrely hungry. You’ll yawn, rub your eyes, and contemplate going back to sleep. But you won’t; you’ll swing your legs out of bed and slippers half-on you’ll wander into the kitchen. Without a second thought, you’ll start making pancakes, greasing the pan with butter and adding extra chocolate chips. You’ll flip them, and it’ll feel so easy, so fun. They’ll fly through the air, and you’ll laugh as they land on the stove with a plop. You’ll have to put them back in the pan and wait a couple minutes. The edges will turn golden-brown, and you’ll switch off the stove. You’ll finally find that syrup in the back of your cabinet, and you’ll open it for the first time in years. It’ll all spill out, too much, but you won’t really care. You’ll just dip your finger in it, and you’ll realize that this, this is what recovery tastes like.

Ingredients:

  1.  1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
  2. 2 eggs
  3.  3/4 cup blueberries
  4. 1 cup milk
  5. 3 tablespoons melted butter OR mildly flavoured (I recommend either vegetable or canola, but coconut can be substituted if necessary) oil, extra for greasing and garnish
  6. 1 1/2 tablespoons vanilla extract
  7. 1 3/4 tablespoons sugar
  8. 2 teaspoons baking powder
  9. 3/4 teaspoon salt
  10. Maple syrup, optional, to taste

Preparation:

  1. In a large bowl, combine flour, baking powder, and salt. Mix thoroughly and set aside.
  2. In a smaller bowl, combine the eggs, vanilla, and milk. Whisk well.
  3. Combine the contents of the two bowls. Stir until the batter is uniform.
  4. Add blueberries.
  5. Heat a griddle or large frying pan to medium heat. Grease it with butter or oil so that the pancakes do not stick to it.
  6. In approximately 1/4 cup portions, ladle the batter onto said pan.
  7. Let the pancake cook for approximately two minutes or until golden brown on the bottom.
  8. Flip your pancake and cook for another 2 to 2 1/2 minutes.
  9. Repeat steps 6-8 until you run out of batter.
  10. Serve pancakes with butter and syrup.
  11. Enjoy!

World Heart Day

Did you know that heart disease is the leading cause of death globally, killing an appalling 17.5 million people a year? Did you know that every forty seconds one person in America will have a heart attack? Did you know that 657 people in the United Kingdom will have a stroke today? Did you know that over 25% of Australian men suffer from hypertension? Did you know that heart disease costs the Canadian economy over $20.9 billion annually? Did you know that a quarter of all deaths in India can be attributed to cardiovascular disease? Did you know that heart disease takes twice as many lives as cancer in Malaysia? Did you know that over half the Mexican population is at risk for heart disease? Did you know that 278,933 Russian males died of coronary heart disease in 2009? Did you know that 26 million individuals suffer from heart failure? Did you know that 1 in 100 babies is born with a congenital heart defect? Did you know that 42 million women worldwide have a heart condition? Did you know that 98% of people do not survive out of hospital cardiac arrests? Did you know that things are only getting worse?

Heart disease is on rise. There has been a 60 million to 1 billion person increase in cases of uncontrolled hypertension between 1980 and the present. 1 in 10 school aged children are now overweight. 7% of the world smokes cigarettes. 23% of adults do not get the recommended amount of physical activity. Diabetes has increased in many countries by 50% in the past ten years. These risk factors, combined with the aging population, urbanisation, and inadequate prevention, are leading to a cardiovascular epidemic. By 2030, heart disease will have an annual death toll 24 million as well as a global economic burden of $1044 billion. These statistics are terrifying, and it is time we start taking heart disease seriously.

So ask yourself, are you at risk? Is your weight healthy? Do you follow your national heart association’s recommended exercise guidelines? Are you a non-smoker who drinks less then 14 units of alcohol weekly? Is your cholesterol below 200 mg/dL? Is your blood pressure 120/80 or lower? Are your electrolytes and blood sugar within the normal ranges? If you answered no to any of these questions, you are, indeed, at risk. Go see a cardiologist as soon as possible. You should also schedule an appointment immediately if you experience any of the following: chest pain (angina) or discomfort, palpitations, shortness of breath, arm/jaw/stomach pain, any cardiac arrhythmia, fatigue, nausea, and/or sweating. It is better to be safe than sorry.

Please, please be heart smart this World Heart Day. Know your numbers, get heart checked, and commit to a healthy lifestyle. Protect yourself and those you love. I know you may think you’re invincible, but heart disease can happen to anyone; don’t let it be you. Thank you so much for reading, and I hope you have a happy, healthy World Heart Day!

Cupcakes-&-Cardiology-Simran-Frontain-73

Rebirthday

I died on August 29th of last year. My heart stopped, and anorexia killed me. I was technically dead for three minutes.The doctors didn’t think I would make it. I was too far gone. The defibrillators weren’t working; my heart was too damaged; I would never recover from anorexia. Why bother trying? They called my cardiologist to tell her patient had died; she told them to try one more time.

They did, and that’s when the miracle happened. That’s when my heart started beating again; that’s when my lungs started breathing again. That’s when I opened my eyes; that’s when I learned to see. There were sparkles on the ceiling and jewel-drops in my eyes. There was a buzzing in my ears and a million voices in my head; I could hear them all clearly, and they were telling me the truth–the cold, hard, cement-stairwell truth: They told me I couldn’t go on like this; they told me I had to recover. 

And they were right; I knew they were. I couldn’t go on like this, and I didn’t want to. I had to make a change; I had to do this once and for all; I had to recover. 

And so on August 29th, 2016, after ten long years, I finally began my recovery journey. I sought the help of a dietician, psychologist, cardiologist, gastroenterologist, psychiatrist, general practitioner, and liver specialist. I underwent extensive physical and psychological therapy. I gained thirty-eight pounds. I got in touch with my emotions. I learned to eat and exercise in moderation. I found freedom with food and within myself. I broke away from anorexia, and I came back to life.

I was reborn on August 29th of last year. My heart started, and I beat anorexia. I’ve been alive for approximately 525,600 minutes. I survived. The doctors saved me; my heart conditions are now managed with medications; I am recovering from anorexia. Who would’ve thought? I made it out alive, and you can, too. 

Cake at a Funeral

I went to a funeral yesterday. I brought cake. It was a pink cake, pink with rainbow sprinkles. I had to take the elevator so I didn’t drop it. I set it down on the table when I got there–the little table, the rectangular table, the table with all the magazines. I had to leave it there while I payed–two hundred and forty dollars, as it sat there on the New England Journal of Medicine, two hundred and forty dollars, pink on the orange and the white. I felt the urge to write on it, that pang again; I even had my paper out, but I didn’t know what to say. The door opened, front and to the left. A head poked out, and a soft voice said “Hello”; you could barely hear her–her lips moved, but her voice was barely there, a cloud, a cumulus cotton candy cloud on the stagnant sugar-wind. I stood up; that was my cue. My flip-flops thwacked the carpet as I walked towards her, and I saw my cake soar past the rose-gold chairs, up, up under the aureate lights. 

She asked me “How are you?”

I handed her the cake. 

“Is that for me?”

I nodded.

“It’s very pretty.” 

I shrugged. 

“What kind of icing is that?”

“Vanilla. Vanilla with sprinkles.”

We reached the door. She stopped. I went in first. She closed the door. We both sat down. The chairs were brown. 

“How are you?” She asked again.

That’s when I began to cry. She wasn’t going to ask me that anymore.

“Are you okay?”

Silence settled like ashes in an urn.

“Do I have to go?” I asked her. 

“You don’t have to do anything.”

I curled up into a little ball, bringing my knees to my chest. She peered across the carpet, watching as I sobbed, watching as my tears rolled down onto my knees. 

“I heard your session with Adrien was hard.” 

“It was… It’s just…”

“I know.”

“You really can read minds.”

Smiles. Silence. Sobs.

“Thank you for the cake. It’s very festive.”

I looked up. Her eyes were such a pretty blue. “It’s a cake of mourning.” I informed her. 

She laughed. It wasn’t supposed to be funny. 

“I feel like I’m going to a funeral.” I told her. “Preparing for this appointment, I felt like I was going to a funeral.”

It was her turn to nod.

“It’s like… I just…”

“I know.”

“I feel like I’m losing a parent.” 

“Yeah.”

“But, like, an actual parent. Not like when my dad died, that didn’t matter, and my mom could die now for all I care.”

She didn’t judge. I could see the sadness in her eyes; I could see my sadness; I could see the care, the compassion there. There was no judgement; no, she didn’t judge; she just listened. 

“A parent I actually care about.”

“You’ve learned to care. You’ve learned to sit with your feelings.” She was right. Always.

“I just didn’t think I’d have to say goodbye. I just expected I’d quit treatment, die, or just not care…”

“But you do.”

“But I do.”

“Is it hard to say goodbye to me?”

“No.” I wiped my nose on my sleeve. The lie was so obvious that we both laughed.

“Do you think you’re never going to see me again?”

Another wave of tears, heavier this time, a downpour, torrential like an Austin August.

“From my side, I can still answer your emails, and you can call me anytime. If you’re ever in Austin, if you ever need anything, you can come and see me.” 

I looked out the window. A bird flew by. A bus drove down a hill.

“If I don’t hear from you for a while, I’ll have to close your chart. That just means that part of our treatment is over.”

“I’ll send you copies of my books when I publish them.” I said. 

“I’d like that.”

“And when I write a goodbye letter–which I will do–I’ll mail it to you.” 

“From London?”

“You’re probably disappointed I didn’t write one.” I said, avoiding the issue. “I meant to, but I didn’t know what to say.”

“That’s okay.”

“It’s not. Adrien and Vanessa both got one.”

“It’s okay.”

I wept. My tears hit the couch this time.

“When I heard you were moving to London, my first thought was that you were running, and then I thought maybe she’s ready.”

“Am I?”

“Only you can answer that.”

“But you know everything.”

She smiled. I memorized pattern on the tissue box–white with yellow diamonds, white with yellow diamonds and blue dots. 

“Do you need a prescription from me?” She asked finally. 

“I don’t know.”

“Can you fill it there?”

“I don’t know.”

“Can you get three months’ supply here?”

“I guess.”

“That gives you a little wiggle room, time to find someone in London.”

I didn’t want to find someone in London. “According to Google, all the psychiatrists in London are old white men who specialize in serial killers.” 

She laughed. I didn’t. 

“Seriously.”

“I’m sure they’re not all old white men who focus on serial killers.”

“They are.”

She smiled and walked over to her desk. I watched. Her white skirt swished as she walked, her Toms changing the colour of the carpet. I could hear the pen scratching.

“I don’t want to go.” I whispered. 

She looked at me, her blue eyes melting. 

“I don’t want to go.” 

She handed me the prescription. I took it. 

“I’ll be here, if you change your mind.”

“Promise?”

“Promise.” A single tear rolled down her cheek.

“Thank you.” 

She didn’t say anything. She just wrapped me up in her warm arms, and held me close as we both shook with tears. 

“I’ll finish the goodbye letter.” I said, pulling away.

“I’m excited to read it.” She replied, putting her hand on the doorknob. 

“It’s time, isn’t it?”

She nodded.

I gave the office one last look, one last time, and then I stepped into the hallway with a smile on my face and tears in my eyes, because I knew I was ready, because I knew it was time to move on. London was calling, and life was waiting. So goodbye for now Dr. S, and thank you, thank you for everything. I love you so much. 

Wear It Beat It Day

Today 7 million people in the United Kingdom will fight their daily battles with cardiovascular disease. Today 435 people will lose that battle; today 110 of them will be under the age of 75. Today 530 people will go to the hospital with a heart attack; today 190 of those people will die. Today 657 people will have a stroke; today 109 of them won’t survive. Today 12 babies will be diagnosed with a congenital heart defect; today 1 of them won’t get to grow up. Today 82 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests will occur; today less than eight of them will live to see tomorrow. 

Today 34% of people in the United Kingdom will live with high blood pressure; today over half of them will continue to go without treatment. Today 6% of the population has diabetes; today that number does not include the estimated one million who remain undiagnosed. Today 27% of people in the United Kingdom will be obese; today 34% of them are overweight. Today 25% of people will exceed the national alcohol intake recommendations. Today 39% of people will not get adequate physical activity. Today 25% of people will not eat enough fruit and vegetables. Today 17% of people will smoke a cigarette; today smoking-induced cardiovascular complications will kill 55 people. 

Today you can do something about these numbers. Today you can maintain a healthy weight. Today you can quit smoking. Today you can get cardiovascular exercise. Today you can eat balanced diet. Today you can visit your doctor and get heart-checked. 

Today is Wear It Beat It Day. Today we wear red to raise awareness about heart disease. Today we stand in solidarity with those effected. Today we honor the lives lost and lived to and with cardiovascular disease. Today we donate to fund lifesaving research. Today we fight heart disease.