How to Travel with an Eating Disorder

Travelling with an eating disorder is stressful–whether you’re in relapse or recovery. Your normal foods are not available. You can’t eat at your regular times. You’re not able to exercise like you normally do. It’s hard, I get it. I’ve been there many times, and it was horrible. But you know what? I survived.

My advice is simple. Fuck it. Yes, you read that correctly. Fuck it! Obviously make sure you’re eating enough, but other than that, fuck it. Throw all your food rules out the window, and just eat whatever the fuck you want. Sampling the local cuisine is part of experiencing a culture, so try anything and everything. Does your destination have a signature dish? Get it from several places and see how it differs regionally. Are you going to the beach? Lick an ice cream cone as you lay in the sun. Have you heard about any cool restaurants in the area? See if they live up to the hype. Do you walk by a bakery as you leave your hotel? Buy a pastry to snack on while you explore. Is there a coffee shop near a landmark you’re going to? Sit there with some tea and watch people walk by.

Will you gain weight on this trip? Maybe. Will you lose a couple pounds? Possibly. Will your weight stay exactly the same? Perhaps. Who knows, and honestly, who cares? Travel is a opportunity and a privilege. Don’t waste your time and money working out in hotel rooms and scouring the city for the lowest calorie salad. Go experience the place you’re in. Talk to the locals, visit the museums, shop on the high streets, and most importantly, eat the food. Enjoy your vacation! The memories you make matter so much more than the number on the scale.

Review: Black Velvet Birthday Cake from Sprinkles Cupcakes

I’ve decided to start doing food reviews, and I thought I’d kick things off with an unpopular opinion. I don’t like Sprinkles. Their cakes are bland and dry, their frosting sparse and crusty. The cupcakes come in an odd square shape, which, in addition to being incredibly unattractive, minimises product surface area. You are paying a lot of money for very little dessert. It’s a rip-off! Also, what is the thing on top? Is it a dragée? Is it candy? Is it someone’s lone, pathetic attempt at a sprinkle? I don’t know, but it’s whatever it is, it’s disconcertingly flavourless, bizarrely crunchy, and otherwise inedible. That goes for their merchandise as a whole.

That being said, I found myself in line at a Sprinkles today. I caught a typographical error on their website, and they gave me a coupon for a free cupcake. I am not one to turn down free food, so I took this opportunity to try their new limited edition offering, a black velvet cupcake with chocolate cream cheese frosting and rainbow sprinkles inside. It wasn’t horrible.

The sponge was unpleasantly grainy, but there was much more of a chocolate flavour than I’ve gotten from them in the past; it wasn’t just “brown vanilla”. The frosting was also better than I remembered; it was by no means smooth or creamy, but at least it didn’t flake off like before. I wish the cake were moister and the chocolate flavour stronger, but this would’ve been a fine cupcake—if it weren’t for the nonpareil filling. The sprinkles themselves are the demise of this Sprinkles creation. Obviously, signaturely cheap, they were like eating pebbles, not to mention a potential choking hazard. Nutella, peanut butter, marshmallow cream, or really anything would’ve been preferable. They could’ve left it empty, for all I care; even that would’ve been an improvement.

All in all, I did not like this cupcake, and I (still) do not like Sprinkles. This is a 5/10 offering from a 5/10 place. Go elsewhere to meet your cupcake needs, but if you insist on visiting Sprinkles, opt for red velvet, gingerbread, or salted caramel. They’re less reprehensible.

The Black Velvet cupcake (depicted below/described above) is available through Sunday at all Sprinkles locations. Get yours (or don’t), and let me know what you think. Any questions? Requests for products you want reviewed? Offers of free stuff? General tidings? Comment below.

Exercise in Eating Disorder Recovery

People in eating disorder recovery tend to completely avoid exercise. They have abused it in the past, so they see no point in returning to it; if it wasn’t healthy then, what good could it possibly do now? They figure the best option is just to give it up, but that’s not entirely true. Exercise is a necessary component of physical and mental health, and in MODERATION, it can behove your heart, blood, bones, and mind.

Dr. Jonathan Meyers put it perfectly when he said ‘exercise has a favorable effect on virtually all risk factors of cardiovascular disease’. This is attributed to a dipartite strengthening of the myocardial muscle and a simultaneous elimination of excess adipose tissue, both of which lower blood pressure, stress, and low density lipoprotein (“bad”) cholesterol. The former occurs when the heart gets the stronger and expends less force pumping blood (thusly exerting significantly less pressure upon the arteries) while the latter is causes decreases in body and size and consequent oxygen demand, lowering the rate and force which the heart has to pump. A reduction in body fat also lessens the risk for diabetes (ergo diabetic heart problems including diabetic cardiomyopathy and glycolic arteriosclerosis).

There is evidence, too, that exercise increases “good” cholesterol synthesis and survival (circulation) by 25% and 27%, respectively. It is involved in increasing the production and action of several enzymes that function to enhance the reverse cholesterol transport system (the uptake and excretion of cholesterol by high density lipoproteins). These enzymes are lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), which promotes the esterification of free cholesterol and synthesis of HDL via lipoprotein core sequesterization and hydrophobic gradient formation, as well as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which delipidizes LDL precursors (chylomicrons and VLDL) for energy expenditure and metabolism causing consequent decreased triglyceride concentration and remnant-based HDL synthesis. Furthermore, endurance training burns adipocytes (for fuel) and preconditions myogenesis, further raising HDL cholesterol by developing LPL synthesizing/secreting (muscular) tissue and decreasing LDL cholesterol through elimination of its partial moiety (triglyceride stores). As HDL cholesterol increases and LDL cholesterol decreases, the risk of cardiovascular disease decreases proportionally by 1% per mg/dL.

Exercise also benefits your blood and bones. Workouts expending 4.2 to 5 megajoules (of energy) per week can increase blood plasma volume by up to 15%, and the stress of weight-bearing induces bone-strengthening osteogenesis, the latter occurring when osteocytes signal the multiplication of osteoblasts. Bone disorders such as osteopoenia and -porosis can thereby be reversed and treated while blood disease and deficiency problems are remitted and managed. This is especially important for people with eating disorders, many of whom have low plasma volume and bone density values due to malnutrition.

Last but not least, exercise is crucial to mental well-being. It improves memory via neurogenesis and elevates energy by transiently increasing cardiac output (stroke volume x heart rate). Exercise is also known to tripartitely alleviate anxiety and depression through thermogenesis (heat production in certain brain regions resulting in feelings of physical and psychological relaxation), endorphin release, and activation of monoamine metabolic pathways. There is an additional correlation between exercise and self-esteem, attributed to the prerequired perspectival shift from body appearance to function, making you not only think but feel better!

The American Heart Association recommends three to four thirty minute sessions of moderate intensity activity per week. Ask your doctor if you’re healthy enough for exercise, and get up and get moving. Take a walk, try a dance class, do some yoga! Find what works for you and have fun with it!

(Thank you so much to Dr. Sheila Sahni and Kaleigh Kessler, RD for your help on this post. You are both spectacular and so, so smart.)